Friday

The Afterlife "Expert"

I think it's pretty funny that George Noory has dubbed me "The Afterlife Expert."



As noted, I've been on the air with him six different times, and each time we go on the air together, my book sales jump.  

They don't just jump, they skyrocket.  

I've cataloged this effect - saving the charts the day they hit #1 (after appearing on his show.)

As I've pointed out before, and to anyone who has read my books, "Flipside: A Tourist's Guide on How to Navigate the Afterlife" "It's a Wonderful Afterlife: Further Adventures into the Flipside" and "Hacking the Afterlife: Practical Advice from the Flipside"

...I am fond of saying

"I am not an expert at anything."

Sure, I've had an unusual, eclectic journey on the planet - like most people. I've performed in bands that have played the House of Blues, I've written for magazines like Variety, Premiere and Inc.com, I've had teeny tiny minor roles in films (cameos in "Salt," a few lines in "Personal Best," "Limit Up" and "You Can't Hurry Love.")  I graduated magna cum laude with a Humanities degree from Boston University (although I thought it was a joke when they announced it during graduation - as I thought for sure I'd flunked a few classes. Had no idea what it mean in Latin. Still means little on this planet.)


Directing "Point of Betrayal" in 1996

Me, me, me, me!  There's a story that Robert Thurman tells that he quotes often - and it was a study that the Dalai Lama had mentioned to him (two great name drops in one sentence) that said there was a study of patients at a hospital in Boston, and they found that those who spent a lot of time saying "Me, I, I am, I feel" self centric egoistic language - had more health problems than those who didn't single themselves out.

Vanum populatum already.

(Funny - here's both words in a Latin book published in 1696 - it means "annihilate vanity")

But I am saying, despite going into the film world, working on dozens of films, having written and directed a gaggle of them, made some documentaries - I haven't mastered that craft in any stretch of the imagination.  I feel like I could if given more chances to do so - but what can you do?  If you can't direct a film, you can direct traffic... or in my case, direct questions to people who are on the Flipside.


With George after taping his TV show

So am I an "Afterlife Expert?"  The moniker itself is counterintuitive, a condundrum - because you'd have to believe there is an afterlife first, then you'd have to believe there's such a thing as an expert on the topic.  But I can say - over the past decade - I've been doing some pretty interesting/unusual forays into examining what people on the flipside say about us back here... with varying results.  The facts don't change - but the stories that people tell me from that perspective - are fascinating and never get tiring, or boring.

And now... a word or two from the Flipside:

Once a week I get a chance to hang out with Jennifer Shaffer - she's a medium/intuitive who works with law enforcement nationwide to help with difficult "missing person" cases.  I know she's been featured in a number of shows, articles, and I've had the privilege to see her in action. She's very good at what she does - but once she's done "reading" or "seeing" or "sensing" images from the flipside - she doesn't remember any of it.  


Intuitive/Medium Jennifer S.

So that's why I bring along my camera. (Jennifer appears in my book "Hacking the Afterlife" - where I ask if we can query folks no longer on the planet.  I had no idea if that was a possibility, but as I point out in "Hacking" she gave me information that I did not know, could not have known, but prove to be accurate.  "New Information" from the other side.)

I film these events.  So is there a film in the future? Likely. Is there another book coming out of these tapings?  Equally likely.  It's like I set out the gunpowder, and then wait for a spark to ignite it.  Haven't quite gotten there yet, but I'm sure I will.

Yesterday, I was asking questions to a crowd of people on the Flipside.  I completely understand how wacky this sounds - and Jennifer and I took a moment to laugh "If anyone heard what we were doing or talking about they would think we are nuts."  We may be nuts.  It doesn't matter, does it?  They just don't make straight jackets like they used to.


Dubious are we? You should be.
But here we were chatting with a crowd of folks - I would tell you who they were, because that would goose up the readership of this blog - that would be an easy way to say "Oh, I just spoke to (celebrity who is dead) and they told me to tell you blah blah blah."  I don't think that's fair to anyone - to the family and friends of the deceased, or even to the person we're talking to, who may change their mind, or learn something new on their path over there.

But when something comes through that I think I can pass along - I will figure out a way to do it, either in book form, or film form.  Yesterday the topic of suicide came up.


Excuse me, what came up?
It came up in a funny way, actually.  We were speaking to someone who died from a self inflicted act - and a group of others were there, who also had checked out early due to self inflicted drug use, or depression, or other reasons.  I noted "Hey everyone talking to us now is someone who checked themselves out. What do you guys have to say to people over on our side who are thinking of doing so?"

I'm going to paraphrase here. Like I say, I filmed it, have a record of it - and will use the transcript in the next book - but for the sake of discussion, they (a few different folks) said:

"You're going to miss a lot about being alive."

I asked "what, specifically?"

"Being able to breathe. You don't really appreciate it, but it's fun.  You'll miss tactile things. Like music.  You can't really pick up a guitar and strum it over here - you can create that mentally, but it's not the same. Just like hugging a tree is not the same. It's a mental idea of a tree, but it's not as much fun as wrapping your arms around a tree and really hugging it."

I asked someone I knew (know) really well what she missed the most about not being here.

Jennifer said "She's showing me being in convertible.. (to me: "did you have a convertible?" Me; "Yes, when I knew her.") and just letting her hair fly all over the place, that feeling of traveling and feeling the air around you.  The taste of things. The smells...  all of it. You really miss those things, that you don't really appreciate while you're there, but you miss them when you're here."

Today a woman was talking to me about why she goes barefoot on her walks in Griffith park.  She said "I read somewhere that having your shoes off, puts you in a different relationship with nature, and that it helps your health to be grounded."


Being grounded.

Yes, that's what you'll miss... being here on the planet.  Having your toes in the green hair of the earth (grass), picking up a clump of flesh (dirt), feeling a wave wash over you (wind) or just lying in the sun and cooking (or having vitamin D replenish.)   Breathing is the opposite of being a tree.  If you look at a tree - its branches - they mirror the lungs, don't they? Exactly.

And when you breathe, you suck in the oxygen that comes from trees, from planets - which if it were water would choke you - but because it's oxygen, it keeps you alive - and then you exhale that carbon dioxide, which... hey, wouldn't you know it, goes right back into the trees.  A perfect system.

(Unless you're polluting the system - gas fumes, cigarettes, alcohol...)

And the person we were talking to about a recent suicide said "Yes, talk about suicide. Talk about loving life.  Because every small thing you do to negate life, is a form of suicide. Every cigarette you smoke, every time you damage your brain cells with too much alcohol, or vape - it's another form of suicide. (and by extension allowing the govt to pollute the planet) It just take that much longer for you to get there, but make no mistake, it's a form of suicide."

I say it came up in a "funny way" because when asked "so how did you die?" one of the other people put a funny image in Jennifer's mind of someone croaking, their tongue out, head sideways. (Like with a rope) And it was later that day that we discovered this person had died in that precise manner.  So not funny - but the person who did the image was famous for being funny - what can you do? They were all together in the room - not mourning, but just chatting with us. And the topic came around to regrets for having checked out "early."

"I toyed with it quite a bit" this person said.  I asked what that meant.  They said "toying with it, by getting close to it more than once... and I didn't plan to check out this time either, it just happened."

I asked this person "what it was like crossing over, did anyone come to see you?"  And he named two people that were "in the room" as we were speaking - one of whom neither Jennifer nor I had any experience with before, but said that "they were old friends and he showed up" to greet this person on the other side - to ease the transition.

After we were done chatting, and my camera battery ran out - a waiter came over and asked what we were up to. I told him briefly about filming our "talks."  He said "I wish I could talk to my sister." Jennifer said "She was 16, when she passed."  He froze. "Yes." "She wants to tell you she's with you, and also with your family when you go back to North Carolina."  The waiter looked at me, shock on his face. I looked at him and asked "How old was your sister when she passed?" "16, wow." he said. "And where are you from?" I asked. "North Carolina."  I said "Well that's a fabulous tip, isn't it? Your sister just came through to tell you she's always with you, no matter where you are."


with Jennifer Shaffer and Scott De Tamble

And Finally....

I got a letter the other day from someone who seemed at his rope's end.  He said he was in pain 24/7 and didn't think there was a reason to go on.  He wanted to know my opinion about what it might be like on the flipside if he did himself in.

I said, and I repeat it here for anyone reading this: "I'm not an expert.  I'm not a medical professional. I'm a filmmaker guy writing about an interesting topic. That question must be addressed by a medical professional" - and if he didn't have one he needed to seek one out immediately."

But I said, because I understand what was being asked, I felt compelled to respond.  Here in part was my response:


"Thanks for writing.  I appreciate the question, and I understand what you are asking me.  On behalf of all those who've participated in the journey that is your life - I beseech you - implore you - to seek counseling.  I understand there's an issue of pain, and I understand that there's the idea of "ending the pain" - and I am not a professional in the field of medicine.  Your family, your friends, every teacher you've ever had - everyone who has ever known you - would want you to seek out help.  And I do mean of the professional kind.  (If you can't think of someone, just search for a local place near you. It's easy to do or find.)

But I also understand the nature of your question, and I'm going to address it directly.

First of all - you chose this life. You chose your parents, you chose to experience this.  You chose it specifically because you felt you could handle it.  I don't say that lightly. I say that as a friend, as a fellow traveler, as someone who, if I was part of your soul group, would stand in front of you and say "You said you can handle this. You have work to do while you're down there on the planet. You have to handle this. You can handle this. Buck up man, you chose this difficulty because in the past you took the easy way out - and you said "I can do it this time, I can overcome this, and I will."  And all of your council members came together and said "Bravo! We love you brother, we support you 100% you can handle this."

At the moment it seems like you can't handle it.  First things first. Let's separate the issues.  1. there's pain.  Usually that's the topper, that's all you need to know. Pain is pain.  Is it 100% pain all day, can't move a muscle kind of pain?  Well, no, because you were able to write this letter.  So let's allow that it's not 24/7 pain. In fact, I'm going to bet that you can sleep - albeit when you wake up you're in pain, but you can sleep - so when you're asleep, you're not in pain.

So that means a third of the day - roughly - there is no pain.

I mean this seriously.  A third of the day you are not conscious of the pain.  Okay? So now I want you to count how many hours in the day that you are in pain.  Is it 8?  Is it more?  Is it less?  Figure it out.  Take out a tally sheet and add them up.  Let's say that it's four hours of unbearable pain - four hours of bearable pain, and the rest is psychosomatic - or let's just say, is compounded by other factors. (Lack of friends, lack of family, wrong president in the white house, etc).

Okay - now I'm going to give it to you straight. Can you handle four hours a day of unbearable pain?  No? Light up a joint.  Yes. You can.  If you aren't in a state where pot is legal, get to one. Go there. I was just in Vegas - it's every where - the whole city was stoned. I used to travel to amsterdam - stoned city!  Go to california - colorado - anywhere it's legal and stay there. Smoke the right pot until you don't feel the pain. We'll get to the other issues in a minute, but start there.

1. How do I stop the pain?

Smoke pot.  

Opiods - sure they make you zone out - but too many side effects like "wanting to kill yourself."

Which brings me to point 2.

2. Why am I depressed?

I heard you. You are depressed. I don't blame you. But I want to tell you that you can stop the depression. You can kill the depression. You can kick the shit out of depression. I can show you how to do it, but you have to bear with me dude.  You have to want to kick this habit - of allowing the many sad thoughts to pile into the backseat of your pick up truck and weigh you down.  Kick those thoughts out of your truck one at a time.

You weren't born with family. You chose to come into the world. You chose your mom and dad - and then, for whatever reason you chose to have this accident. You chose to experience this kind of hardship.  In the cases I've examined, its usually because in a future life you'll be a doctor and you'll teach people about pain and healing.  You can ask your guides why this happened. Have you tried between life therapy?  It would be fantastic for you.  Tell me what state your in and I'll recommend someone for you.  

But that's not kicking depression to the curb. That's just going to make you understand "why" you chose this difficult lifetime.  Let's just allow for a moment that I'm speaking the truth. You chose this for a reason. Not to give up on it - but to learn from it.  It's easy to check out - people do it all the time. but you didn't come here, you didn't get on stage to jump off the stage.  I know it's hard - but seriously - you said you could handle it, and that's what we all expect you to do.

So - how to kick depression to the curb?

I talk about it in Flipside.  "Tonglen."  Look it up. Search it on youtube.  When you're not in pain (you can be stoned, that won't affect this meditation) you try to do this meditation.  It's been proven (richard davidson university of wisconsin) to CURE OR ALLEVIATE SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION.

There are no side effects.

So here's what you're going to do.  Put on some music. Something that makes you feel good.  Get in a comfortable position.  Then picture yourself as a younger man. Happy, in the prime of life.  Picture the clothes your wearing,the hair you had, whatever - create that image like a 3d picture in your mind.  Make it real.  Make your eyes twinkle.  "Hey, that's me!"  Create you in your mind.

Then think about the spots on your body that hurt - or ache - doesn't matter which ones - focus on them.  Picture a color - the first thing that comes to mind - what color is that body part? (You can imagine a smoke, that works too, but if you just picture a color it's easy).  Then as you breathe in during this meditation, imagine that part of the body opening up and releasing the pain - imagine the pain as a color and pull it out of the joint, body part, and into you - who are meditating... really see that color or smoke emerge from the body of the young man you're looking at, and as that wounded part releases it's energy, you hit it with a blast of healing light from the universe.

You heard me.  Hit that pain with the whitest hot light you can imagine - CGI effects and all - and turn it into a healed light or smoke... pick any healed color that comes to mind - and breathe it back into that part of your body that needs healing, breathe it back into the body of that young man that needs healing.

Do this over and over and over again until the light changes... it will... just keep doing it.

Now here's the really cool info; you've just done a centuries old tibetan meditation - called "give and take."  And while there's no evidence that it cures the person you're meditating on (although you may actually feel better in the parts you've focused on) there is a huge body of scientific evidence that it cures depression in the person doing the meditation.
Richard Davidson and his pal HHDL
You got that?

No side effects. Cures depression.

Now - I'm going to give you one more meditation - because you sound like you need it.

So - try to remember, you're not in pain 24/7 although it feels like it - you're in pain for so many hours in a day - I can point to any number of people that I know who are suffering right now in much more profound pain that you could imagine - from physical deformities to disease - in constant pain - who can't write on a computer, can't read a letter, can't listen to what I'm writing to you.

So you have that.

First before I teach you this other meditation - which will solve your issues of your family and friends - I want you to just think for a moment on how you came to meet your family and friends.  You chose them. There's no accident that you chose them. You did it because you knew they would not be here for you at this moment - you actually said in your pre-life session "You can't be there for me when I need you otherwise I will not be able to learn the lesson I need to learn."  (I wasn't there, but I have heard something like this before - from people who were molested sexually, or some other awful childhood trauma where they saw and understood why they asked their loved one to abuse them - to teach or learn lessons from it.  Sounds harsh, but you're asking for the truth, so I'm giving it to you.)

..............
Do this every day. Every day. Every day.

count the hours of pain - and try to take minutes off of that number every day... try to take less pain medication if you can, smoke more pot if you can, try to meditate on unconditional love towards everyone and all things... and then you'll see.

You'll see why you wrote to me.

You'll see why you chose to be here.

You'll see who you are here to help.

You'll see who you are here to teach.

You'll see it all.

If you can find a hypnotherapist near you (there's a searchable databased at Newton Institute.org - find a Newton trained hypnotherapist near you.

When I was doing my first of five sessions, I asked the folks back there, back home, if there was anything that I could pass along to people who might read what I had to say on the topic.

And i heard: "Just let go."

Let go of anger. Let go of resentment. Let go of pain. Let it all go. You're here for a reason, find that reason. Relish that reason.  Find the one or two or three minutes a day where you feel joy - and amplify them - reduce the pain minutes daily by meditating, or by helping someone else who is in pain... and you'll see why you're still here......



I post this for anyone who needs help in this area. Please seek counseling. Seek help from a medical professional. Suicide is not the answer to the question. Unconditional Love is the answer to every question you have.

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