Thursday

Visions of the Flipside

Bosch


Heres a "Tunnel of white light" as heard in a high percentage of NDEs. I've heard variations, ball of light, moving through light, towards and into light. Feelings of unconditional love, infinite wisdom and reconnecting with loved ones. 

Dr Bruce Greyson UVA created the NDE scale, appears in "Its a Wonderful Afterlife." Mario Beauregard Phd, using fmri has proven these events, memories aren't confined to any particular place in the brain, or "god spot." 

He's in the book as well. Science shows these religious experiences arent religious at all, although they do inspire people to realize life isnt confined to this realm. In my research i find no two nde's are identical, yet they all point to the same conclusion. Like the word "home" - no one can define it outside their own experience, yet we can all agree it exists within our own journey. Not based on belief or philosophy but the data. 

Bosch's depiction of hell, on the other hand, is not in the data. 

Great to see in his paintings, but the few accounts I've examined, dissolve under analysis. "So why are you experiencing this?" Or "why did you choose to be here?" allows a person to see choice or free will is involved. This tunnel, on the other hand, is the way "home" according to the 25 I've filmed and thousands of cases I've examined. 

MEANWHILE FROM THE DAILY MAIL ON FEB 25TH, 2016:


The following is a news story about a woman who died for an hour, saw her husband during an NDE and came back. I'm posting it as "further data" - and by data I mean:

I'm referring to the thousands of cases Dr Greyson has examined at UVA, the data from the Aware project (2000 cases over 10 years) even your own brothers experience during an NDE. at some point thousands of cases, examined by scientists becomes "data." And this case is no different than those. Sorry. Its just science. But you'd know that if you read Dr Greyson's chapter in "its a wonderful afterlife." Not belief. Or philosophy. Or a story in the paper. Based on thousands of medical cases.

This story is just like all the other stories. Identical. Dr. Greyson is the person who created the NDE scale back in the 80's. Indeed, the medical establishment considers NDE research science and his articles have been peer reviewed and published. He's considered the "godfather of NDE research." 

His book "Irreducible Mind" is a textbook for many psychiatrists (as he is the head psychiatrist at UVA.) Interviewed him for the book (It's a Wonderful Afterlife). There are other scientists who have studied NDE - the Aware project, where a doctor studied NDEs under clinical conditions (hospitals, ORs, etc). 

As Harvard's Gary Schwartz PhD mentions in the foreword to Flipside - "at some point you have to stop pretending" that these cases are not data. Each and every case has been examined thoroughly that Greyson cites - I recommend his youtube talk "Is consciousness produced by the brain" for further cites.

Just because a person in the UK has the identical experience that other NDE people have - that my own brother had after dying in Fort Benning Georgia - which is also reported in the book - these cases all saying relatively the same thing. And that's how Dr. Greyson was able to make a scale of events for near death experiences. 

I've stayed at Greyson's home, and he's given me a tour of his facilities at UVA. I had a conference meeting with his associates at the Dept of Perceptual Studies - including Drs Jim Tucker, Ed Kelley (PhD from Harvard) when you have thousands of people saying the same things about their experience - the same way people collect data on headaches or acne, at some point subjective reports become "evidence" and "data." 

(I refer also to Mario Beauregard's "Brain Wars" for further cites and medical cases) 

I've documented these cases on film for the past 8 years. so I'm not offering that it's data lightly - but at some point, one has to step back from the insistence that its not data to ask - "why wouldn't we consider it data? At what point or degree would you consider it data, if scientists have gone on record saying that it is data?" 

Some folks will never see these reports as anytime but conjecture (for whatever reason). That's their path. But it's not mine. I've examined thousands of these cases, documented 25 on film and dozens in print - so to me - at the end of the day, since they all say relatively the same thing "I knew it was my wife/son/daughter/best friend because I know what their touch feels like, they answered questions before I could ask them" etc... these reports become what science requires: that they be consistent and replicable.

While this woman may have invented this incident, she didnt invent dying for an hour. The report she gives of seeing her husband is consistent with many NDEs. And as I've done, taking people who've had an NDE and filming them under hypnosis allows them to replicate the event. And as noted in "Its a Wonderful Afterlife" what they report is the same event yet with more clarity. They could dispute the memory of the event, but they do not. 

Doesnt matter what religion they are, what gender or background. They consistently say the same things.

HERE'S THE ARTICLE AS REPORTED FROM THE UK:

'Sonia, it's not your time... just go back to the kids': Bingo worker who 'died' for 56 minutes says she was saved by the spirit of her late husband who told her not to die

  • Sonia Burton, 50, suffered a heart attack and had no pulse for 56 minutes
  • Paramedics refused to give up on her and continued to carry out CPR
  • Mum-of-four said her late husband visited her and said 'it's not your time'
  • Sonia thanked medics who saved her when they were reunited on Tuesday
A bingo worker who had no pulse for almost an hour after suffering a massive heart attack says her late husband visited her and said 'it's not your time'.
Sonia Burton was 'dead' for 56 minutes following her heart attack at the bingo hall in Ashington, Northumberland, but paramedics refused to give up on her.
The mum-of-four said: 'The only thing I remember is my late husband coming to me and saying "it's not your time, Sonia, go back to the children". Then I woke up in hospital.' 
Saved: Sonia, who had no pulse for almost an hour, pictured with her daughters, granddaughter and brother
Saved: Sonia, who had no pulse for almost an hour, pictured with her daughters, granddaughter and brother
Message: Sonia Burton with her late husband John. Sonia said she got a message from John, who died in 2004 following a heart attack aged just 37, while she was being resuscitated 
Message: Sonia Burton with her late husband John. Sonia said she got a message from John, who died in 2004 following a heart attack aged just 37, while she was being resuscitated 
'Every day I think how incredible it is that I'm still here,' she said. 'I don't take anything for granted.'
On the day of her heart attack, Sonia had gone about her daily tasks with daughter Rebecca, 30.
She had been due to start work at Gala Bingo Hall in Ashington at 5.30pm but went in early at 4.45pm to talk to colleagues and have a coffee.
The 50-year-old said: 'I mainly work in the dining area and had been heading out of there when I remember getting a pain in my chest and then collapsing.'
Out cold, Sonia's frantic boss Karen Arkle began trying to resuscitate her as an ambulance was called. 
Within four minutes, paramedic Jason Riches and emergency care assistant Gary French were on the scene, taking over CPR from Karen. 
Sonia described herself as a 'living miracle' as she was reunited with the paramedics who saved her lifeSonia pictured with the people that saved her life - trainee paramedic Rosie Priest (left), and paramedics Stephen Eke (second from left) and Jason Riches (right)
Sonia pictured with the people that saved her life - trainee paramedic Rosie Priest (left), and paramedics Stephen Eke (second from left) and Jason Riches (right)
Sonia described herself as a 'living miracle' as she was reunited with the paramedics who saved her life
They were then backed up by paramedic Stephen Eke and first year student paramedic Rosie Priest.
For the next 56 minutes the team worked to save Sonia as she was transported to Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital in Cramlington.
It was while they were trying to save her that Sonia said she got a message from late husband John, who died in 2004 following a heart attack aged just 37.
'I spoke to him and he told me that it was not my time and I should go back,' she said. 'To be honest, it felt very comforting.'
By the time they arrived at Cramlington hospital, Sonia was still unconscious but had started breathing. 
She was then transferred to Newcastle's Freeman Hospital, where she underwent lifesaving surgery to have a stent fitted in her heart.
Eight days later she was back home, being cared for by brother, Mark, and her four children, Michael, 31, Megan, 22, Rebecca and 19 year old Thomas.
'It's strange to think I was technically dead for an hour,' added Sonia. 'If it wasn't for the guys being there so quickly and not giving up on me, it would have been a very different story. 
'My mind is a bit forgetful and I'm on a lot of medication but otherwise I'm doing really well - and, at the end of the day, I'm still here.'
Sonia Burton, pictured with her granddaughter Sophie Murray, said it would have been a different story if the medics had given up on her
Sonia Burton, pictured with her granddaughter Sophie Murray, said it would have been a different story if the medics had given up on her
 Sonia Burton, pictured with her family, was 'dead' for 56 minutes following her heart attack at the bingo hall
 Sonia Burton, pictured with her family, was 'dead' for 56 minutes following her heart attack at the bingo hall
Sonia's brother Mark, who she lives with, had been walking the dog when he received the call to say his sister had collapsed.
He said: 'They were working on her when I got there. It was frantic, there was no life in her at all.
'I said 'please don't stop' and, they never did.
'I couldn't be more thankful for everything Stephen, Jason and Gary did for Sonia that day. To see Sonia like she was that day and to see her now is phenomenal, I can't express just what a good job they've done.'
Paramedic Stephen, 43, said: 'Jason and I have over 50 years' experience between us and neither of us have ever seen somebody come back after that length of time.
'We often get a return of a pulse, maybe one out of 10, but usually it's just the adrenaline that's making the heart work again and as soon as that wears off they go back into cardiac arrest.
'It's unbelievable to see how well Sonia's doing now.'
Paramedic Jason, 44, said: 'You go into this job to help people. It's a nice feeling knowing that we were able to make a difference and even better to see what a remarkable recovery she's made.'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3418068/Bingo-worker-died-56-minutes-says-saved-late-husband-visited-said-not-time.html#ixzz41Dd8r3qL
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